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Category Archives: Existing photo processed by Bob Lawrence

The Mighty DC-8

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The postmark is 1973.  The Douglas or McDonald Douglas DC-8 was built from 1958 to 1972.  It was in competition with Boeing’s 707 in the new era of jet travel.  556 were made and a few are still in service.  In August, 1961, this was the first civilian jet liner to achieve (for 16 seconds) supersonic flight.

Remember the song lyric, “a big 707’s set to go.”  (Gordon Lightfoot,”Early Morning Rain”)  “Big DC-8’s set to go” doesn’t scan as well…

N. H. D. V. S. Barracks, Johnson City TN

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The National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers had just recently been built when the picture was taken (note the horse and wagon in the foreground).  It’s a lithograph printed in Germany.

USS Shenandoah

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This is a modern real-photo postcard with no attribution.  The picture, however, apparently depicts the USS Shenandoah (ZR-1), which was launched in 1923 and felled by a storm in Ohio in 1925.

The Cunard R.M.S. Queen Elizabeth

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Nice mid-50s Cunard postcard with an artist’s rendering of the original Queen Elizabeth, launched in 1938, but only carried troops until 1946, when it entered regular commercial service.  The artist is C. F. Hopkinson, who actually worked for Cunard as an accountant, according to this posting.

United Mainliner

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This nice postcard is from the late 1940s.  United used that logo from 1940 to 1954.  “Mainliners” were DC-3s.  With world-wide production, some 16,000 of these planes entered service somewhere…and some are probably still flying.

Two Kids

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This is a cropped version of a real photo postcard, printed on Artura stock that was made between 1910 and 1924.  The image was very faded with moderate spotting and scratches.

A couple of things:  I have heavily kicked up the contrast and the sharpness. I brightened the light reflections in the kids’ eyes, but I can’t correct the problem with the left kid’s left leg, as you view him.  Notice that it looks like his leg ends before it even gets to the shoe.  I enlarged it and it appears to be a lens aberration or a case of poor processing.  Maybe he didn’t have a leg there…who knows?

Lonely in Limestone

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This card was mailed almost exactly 104 years ago, when Limestone TN had cowboys and stage coaches. Ah, those were the days…

This is a standard-size postcard, a generic issue overprinted with “Limestone”.  These cards were generally sold by an agent of the printing company, so this particular motif was chosen by someone local…the one who placed the order.  I do not see any printer’s credit on the card.  By 1914 there were dozens of print shops churning out varieties of cheap postcards.

One other <yawn> interesting aspect of this card: to read the message, you rotate the card toward you.  Most cards require a horizontal rotation.