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Category Archives: Uncle Bob’s Pix

A site for displaying photographs by Bob Lawrence

Downtown Bristol TN/VA

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I’ve been mulling over this card for several weeks.  It bothers me.  I grant that it is a picture taken by the legendary Kelly & Green in Bristol. There’s an embossed “K&G 1931” either on the original negative or on the original print.    The EKKP around the “PLACE STAMP HERE” square makes this a Real Photo card printed sometime between 1904 and 1950, when this paper stock was discontinued.  The rest of the back style seems consistent with a 1930s production date (Real Photos are essentially one-offs).

As is typical with camera lenses of the 30s, the focus gets soft around the edges, but it quite crisp in the middle. ( That’s a fake State Line, by the way.  It was drawn in on the negative)  However, on the card itself, the focus is tight to where State Street goes over the hill past the railroad tracks.

The blurring on the car in the foreground doesn’t bother me too much. It may have been veering to avoid that dude standing in the middle of the street with a camera on a tripod.

It’s the clean back that bothers me.  Yet, Real Photos are printed on a higher quality paper than a regular postcard and, if it was done by K&G, it was properly washed after fixing.  If it has been kept separate from any other degrading element (like acidic paper of a photo album), it could very well be in this good condition.

So, I’m 90% sure it’s real.  Still, there’s that other 10%.

Piedmont Airlines Pin

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I can’t find a standard for this on any of the popular sites.  The back has a “C 10 Sterling” marking.  I would guess that it’s a flight attendant’s pin, but, then, when I was a kid, I mistook a skunk for a cat.  Shows you how much I know.

 

1950s Delta Kiddie Wings

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I don’t know why I always get the odd ones.  The standard for this late 1950’s Junior Stewardess pin, given out to young girls when they boarded a Delta plane, is at Fly the Branded Skies.  Look under “D” for Delta.  Mine, however, lacks the cardboard backing that came with every kiddie wings, the Delta logo is crooked and the back’s really crudely done.  No hallmark, either.  Bummer.

Coming Soon to a Pond Near You

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Yeller Cab

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I’m going to put this in a new card folder, but this is mostly how it looked when I bought it (for under $4).  My pencil notation is what I dug up on the web.

In the Land of the Sky

I was going through a pile of perfectly uninteresting post cards at a flea market and happened across this one.  I recognized that it was early, so, for research practice, I bought for the extravagant sum of $1.
Turned out to be an interesting card.  It dates to around 1913 and refers to a sobriquet once applied to the State of North Carolina.  The Land of the Sky, or, Adventures in Mountain Byways is a book published in 1876 by Christian Reid, a.k.a. Mrs. Frances Tiernan.   Later, Asheville adopted the phrase to describe its own vaunted location.  I don’t get the “coffee” bit, nor the reference to Blockade Hill, but I haven’t read the book and will read it probably never, so, well, there you are.

The card was published by Southern Post Card Company in Asheville and it was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago. Teich’s inventory numbers weren’t as organized the the teens as they later became, but the number does set it right at 1913.  In 1914, the publishing houses went to the “Let’s Save Ink!” white-border style (oh, a note: as I’ve mentioned before, if you read that the “linen era” cards were called that because using linen gave them a nice texture, you’ll know the author didn’t know about post card production…the linen finish was applied during printing by using a special textured plate).  Read all about it in the excellent Postcard America, Curt Teich and the Imaging of a Nation by Jeffrey L. Meikle (University of Texas Press, 2015/ISBN 978-0-292-72661-1)

Good card.  Glad I forked over a buck for it.

The Old Land of Oz

I dunno. I think the costumes are creepy.  The Tin Man looks like something from “Radar Men from the Moon” (1952)(look it up. it stars Commando Cody, the man with an asbestos ass).  Dorothy is lovely, though, fake pigtails and all.   The place opened in ’70, burned in ’75 and closed in ’80.  The fire destroyed the original Dorothy dress from the movie, along with other artifacts.  It fell into disrepair and was vandalized.  It’s now open again for short periods during the year.

John Mellencamp sang, “Life goes on, long after the thrill of living is gone…”

Postcard published by Land of Oz…no printer’s credit shown.

(I know that Dorothy looks as if she’s floating.  Trick of the light – she has her right foot raised slightly to look as if she’s walking.)