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Tag Archives: post card

Cunard White Star Lancastria

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The ship was sunk just six months after this card was sent.  Read about her terrible fate here.

And I hope the lady with the excellent handwriting was able to see Gone With the Wind fairly soon up in Marion.

Soldiers’ Home, Johnson City

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This was probably printed in the early 1900s – 1907 – 1910 or so.  “Commercialchrome” shows it was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago using their 4-color, halftone, lithographic process.

This vendor wrote their booth number and the price in ink.  Annoys the hell out of me, but post cards are hard for vendors to control with too many people either altering the price or just slipping them into their pockets.  It’s a hard-knock life, no?

Look, Ma! No Pods!

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All the skinny on this aircraft is here.

After a disastrous, but highly educational, experience with its first Comet iteration, de Havilland has a 30-year success with this 4B.

Sleek aircraft, but there was some concern (from aircraft manufacturers who preferred engine pods) about the engines and the fuel tanks buried in the wings.  Flew right well, though.

The card has been folded along its vertical axis.  Still a good-looking card, I think.

Eight Names, One Ship

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Before this ship was launched as a troop transport in 1944, it was briefly named General R.M. Blatchford (Spanish-American War, WWI).  Upon launch, though, it was the General W.P. Richardson (explorer and geographer for the U.S. Army in Alaska).  Then it was the LaGuardia, then the Leilani then the President Roosevelt.  After that it was the Atlantis, then this Emerald Seas (1972 – 1992), and, finally, the Ocean Explorer I before it was scrapped in India in 2004.  The full history is here.

I think the card dates to between 1963 (when Zip Codes went into effect) and maybe 1970.  It was printed by Koppel Color Card Company in Hawthorne NJ, which operated in the 1960s, and distributed by the Color-Ads Productions noted on the reverse.

’56 Chevy Bel Air

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I grabbed this card as soon as I saw it.  It was $1.  That Chevy, in 1956, cost the princely sum of $3,500.

Not Too Subtle…

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I can’t make out where this was mailed from, but it’s a not-too-subtle message from your friends back in 1910.

  1. American Post Card Company in New York went out of business in 1910.
  2.  Blue Eye MO got its name, reportedly, from the eye color of the first postmaster.

United Mainliner

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This nice postcard is from the late 1940s.  United used that logo from 1940 to 1954.  “Mainliners” were DC-3s.  With world-wide production, some 16,000 of these planes entered service somewhere…and some are probably still flying.