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Category Archives: Ephemera

S. S. United States Needle Card

needlecard

This needle card was issued by the Pioneer Merchandise Company of New York in 1952 (the small print reads “copyright 52 Pioneer Mose. Co. New York”.  It should be “Mdse”. The card was printed in Germany.  The reverse is the same as the front.  Some of the needles remain, but the threader is long gone.

The S.S. (Steam Ship) United States launched in 1951 and, apparently, was a real hot item for a couple of years thereafter.  It was fast, maybe 40 mph on a good day.  It held the record for speedy Atlantic crossings for many years.  It’s now berthed in Philadelphia.

Another Cinderella

Cinderella stamp, that is.  It’s 1.81 x 2.5″.  Two colors on ivory paper.  No adhesive.

The Grand Central Palace was demolished in 1964.

GRAPHIC

Tobacco Sale

Tobacco sale.  1940.  Big whoop, huh?

tobaccofront

tobaccoback

Well, as I write this in September of 2019, there are four instances of post cards on ebay that feature this exact picture, but for four different sales…and not one of those cards is this one.  Curt Teich in Chicago really got a lot of use out of this photo, which was shot in b&W and colored in at the print shop, as usual.

eek!

valentine

(this is a copy…all context is lost)

 

PT-19, Fairchild M62

This airplane debuted in 1940, so the date on the reverse is probably correct.  Parks Air College (1928 – 1966) was the first federally-certified school of aviation.  Located in Cahokia IL.

trainerfront

trainerback

The card was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago.

Cunard White Star Lancastria

lancastriafront

lancastriaback

The ship was sunk just six months after this card was sent.  Read about her terrible fate here.

And I hope the lady with the excellent handwriting was able to see Gone With the Wind fairly soon up in Marion.

Soldiers’ Home, Johnson City

Posted on

soldierfront

soldierback

This was probably printed in the early 1900s – 1907 – 1910 or so.  “Commercialchrome” shows it was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago using their 4-color, halftone, lithographic process.

This vendor wrote their booth number and the price in ink.  Annoys the hell out of me, but post cards are hard for vendors to control with too many people either altering the price or just slipping them into their pockets.  It’s a hard-knock life, no?