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Author Archives: Bob Lawrence

Cinerama!

The Mark Strand Theatre, Broadway and 47th Street in New York, was built in 1914 and tottled along presenting shows and exhibiting moving pictures until 1951.  That year, it became the Warner Theatre.  In 1952, it became the Warner Cinerama Theatre.  This card was issued sometime in 1953 to promote the brand-new Cinerama movie experience.

The building was demolished in 1987 to make room, eventually, for the Morgan Stanley building.

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Kunzli/Mainzer Cats

The artist is Eugen Hartung (1897 – 1973).  He painted many dressed cat pictures, which were published by Max Kűnzli in Zűrich, Switzerland.  After WWII, these were published in the United States by Alfred Mainzer, Inc. of New York.  This is an original Swiss offering, a lithograph (not a screened print), with the unusual deckle edges.  This was a fun research project for me.  I’d never heard of these cards before.  Any comments or corrections will be appreciated.

Note the boy cats in the windows laughing at the girl cats.  And the artist’s signature, which should have been in the lower left, has been cropped out.

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BOAC 707

This version of the 707 debuted in 1960.  The standard-size post card was mailed from Kensington W8.

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The Proud One

This is a continental-size post card, 4″ by 6″.  I think this is the 1968 model.  No side mirrors.

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707 Prototype

This isn’t a post card, but something extracted from a publication of some sort.  I show both sides below.  It’s 7.5 x 4.6″ and on a slick stock about the weight of presentation paper.

Incidentally, this is the aircraft that “Tex” Johnson, an experienced test pilot. rolled twice in 1955 in a flyover at the International Air Transport Association at Lake Washington, near Seattle.  He was told not to do that again.

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Oh, No! That Plane…

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Looks like some photo artist at Curt Teich decided to make a rather bland post card more dramatic by drawing in what looks like a 10B in a power dive over the factory.  Scary looking, though.

Anyway, the card dates to 1939.

Steampunked!

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Tobacco Sale

Tobacco sale.  1940.  Big whoop, huh?

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Well, as I write this in September of 2019, there are four instances of post cards on ebay that feature this exact picture, but for four different sales…and not one of those cards is this one.  Curt Teich in Chicago really got a lot of use out of this photo, which was shot in b&W and colored in at the print shop, as usual.

WSM Radio Tower

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WSM Radio in Nashville went on the air in 1925, but didn’t construct this tower until 1932.  As it states on this post card from 1935, the tower was 878′ tall…until 1939 when, for technical reasons, the height was reduced to 808′.  Read all about it here.

One Door Closes

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And another door opens…

Vickers Viscount

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The graceful Vickers Viscount as was flown by Capital Airlines, previously Pennsylvania Central Airlines, in the early ’50s.

They flew into Knoxville McGhee-Tyson, too.  I still find Pennsylvania Central Airlines stuff here and there (and buy it whenever I can).

A Sentimental Christmas Card

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There’s no attribution on the reverse, so I figure this is an example of the ribaldry you’d find back in the back of your favorite newsstand a few decades ago.  Just for the gents, heh, heh.

It’s standard post card size and in rough condition, but, hey, Merry Xmas!

And admire that kid’s, er, penmanship. 

VA Administration Center

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Much old, great tan.  This 1950 post card views the VA Center from the south, taken on an extremely tall tripod, or possibly from an airplane, whatever.  The Curt Teich date code is just under the words “Place Stamp Here”.

Zimmerman & Torbett News Agency.  I don’t find any informational citations on the web about this business.  I seem to remember that it was a news stand.

You can get a good view of this area as it is now on Google Earth.

Nice Sign

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Can’t spell.

eek!

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(this is a copy…all context is lost)

 

Goodyear Hot Wheels Blimp

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This neat little model of the Goodyear Airship came out in 1992, according to information up on the web.  On the bottom of the passenger car is “1991 Malaysia”.

Turning the tailpiece changes the display.

It’s 3.5″ long and about 1.5″ from bottom to top.

PT-19, Fairchild M62

This airplane debuted in 1940, so the date on the reverse is probably correct.  Parks Air College (1928 – 1966) was the first federally-certified school of aviation.  Located in Cahokia IL.

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The card was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago.

Cunard White Star Lancastria

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The ship was sunk just six months after this card was sent.  Read about her terrible fate here.

And I hope the lady with the excellent handwriting was able to see Gone With the Wind fairly soon up in Marion.

Soldiers’ Home, Johnson City

Posted on

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This was probably printed in the early 1900s – 1907 – 1910 or so.  “Commercialchrome” shows it was printed by Curt Teich in Chicago using their 4-color, halftone, lithographic process.

This vendor wrote their booth number and the price in ink.  Annoys the hell out of me, but post cards are hard for vendors to control with too many people either altering the price or just slipping them into their pockets.  It’s a hard-knock life, no?

A Couple o’ Subs

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This is a K-class sub.  Distinguished service between 1914 and 1923.  The spray, no doubt added in the retouch department, conveniently obscures any identifying marks.

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And this is the mighty Nautilus, decommissioned in 1980 to become a museum ship.

These “Defenders of America” cards came to you via boxes of shredded hay, er, wheat between 1958 and 1959.