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Tag Archives: post card

Look, Ma! No Pods!

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All the skinny on this aircraft is here.

After a disastrous, but highly educational, experience with its first Comet iteration, de Havilland has a 30-year success with this 4B.

Sleek aircraft, but there was some concern (from aircraft manufacturers who preferred engine pods) about the engines and the fuel tanks buried in the wings.  Flew right well, though.

The card has been folded along its vertical axis.  Still a good-looking card, I think.

Eight Names, One Ship

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Before this ship was launched as a troop transport in 1944, it was briefly named General R.M. Blatchford (Spanish-American War, WWI).  Upon launch, though, it was the General W.P. Richardson (explorer and geographer for the U.S. Army in Alaska).  Then it was the LaGuardia, then the Leilani then the President Roosevelt.  After that it was the Atlantis, then this Emerald Seas (1972 – 1992), and, finally, the Ocean Explorer I before it was scrapped in India in 2004.  The full history is here.

I think the card dates to between 1963 (when Zip Codes went into effect) and maybe 1970.  It was printed by Koppel Color Card Company in Hawthorne NJ, which operated in the 1960s, and distributed by the Color-Ads Productions noted on the reverse.

’56 Chevy Bel Air

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I grabbed this card as soon as I saw it.  It was $1.  That Chevy, in 1956, cost the princely sum of $3,500.

Not Too Subtle…

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I can’t make out where this was mailed from, but it’s a not-too-subtle message from your friends back in 1910.

  1. American Post Card Company in New York went out of business in 1910.
  2.  Blue Eye MO got its name, reportedly, from the eye color of the first postmaster.

United Mainliner

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This nice postcard is from the late 1940s.  United used that logo from 1940 to 1954.  “Mainliners” were DC-3s.  With world-wide production, some 16,000 of these planes entered service somewhere…and some are probably still flying.

First Methodist Church, Johnson City TN

Other than the original photos being taken from different viewpoints (or using different lenses), there are four differences between these two cards:

The lower one, obviously, is the earlier.  I think it may have been taken pre-WWII.  The upper one, probably late 40s.

The differences I see:  First, the plate numbers are different (I can only date Asheville Post Card Company cards by inference.  I found another card in the E-7417 range that had a 1948 post mark).  Second, the shrubbery. Third, the sign on the corner in front of the church.  Fourth, the early one is titled merely “JC-71 Methodist Church, Johnson City, Tenn.” and the later one is “JC-75 First Methodist Church, Johnson City, Tenn.”

Let’s Go to Galax!

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Asheville Post Card Company issue called a “Pennant Landscape”
The “Galax, VA.” is an overprint for a standard card.

It was mailed in 1943, when Galax had half its current population.  It’s hard to read the writing, but I did find Sgt. Marrion W(oodward) Fisher.  Camp Santa Anita was a dog racing park in Arcadia CA that had been taken over by the Army for ordnance training.  Sgt. Fisher was born in 1920 in Bath VA.  He died in 2011 in Covington VA.

I think the signature on the card is “James”